Inspired by Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, Australian designer Toni Maticevski offered a wardrobe of upmarket separates alongside bridal gowns.

The rationale behind this is that he doesn’t want to frame his clothes in either couture or ready-to-wear, because Maticevski advocates a way of dressing in which occasion is of little importance. Case in point: One guest at the show wore one of his pencil skirts with an elaborate flourish down the back, paired with Chuck Taylors and a turtleneck.

So there were new versions of that skirt, floaty blouses, blazers with soft drapes falling down the front alongside long dresses and floor-grazing poof skirts. The palette had an earthy chemical reading, running from coal black to a sulfuric chartreuse, while textures alternated between silk-smooth and roughness — thick weaves, sequined gowns, graphic meshes.

One piece, a structured bodice with trailing chiffon panels, epitomized the designer’s vision: worn with trousers by day, it was a statement at night.

By  on October 5, 2017

Inspired by Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, Australian designer Toni Maticevski offered a wardrobe of upmarket separates alongside bridal gowns.

The rationale behind this is that he doesn’t want to frame his clothes in either couture or ready-to-wear, because Maticevski advocates a way of dressing in which occasion is of little importance. Case in point: One guest at the show wore one of his pencil skirts with an elaborate flourish down the back, paired with Chuck Taylors and a turtleneck.

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