Ottolinger had a new theme this spring: rural Switzerland. That’s where they found a traditional edelweiss flower fabric.

“This is what the farmers work in,” said Cosima Gadient, tugging at her top to show the flowers. She and her design partner Christa Bösch applied their knotting technique, which they have used in the past, to their new material, building a button-up wrap dress.

The pair is known for deconstructing garments, reassembling them in unexpected ways. The zipper on a pair of jeans in the collection was skewed to the side, and the inside seam gradually crept outward as it ran down the leg. The knotted sash on the back of a shirt? That was a shirt sleeve. They also played with dyeing techniques.

“We tried to have our own colors,” noted Bösch, eyeing a pair of thigh-high nylons that were dyed in a mustard brown color. They chose a boat to display the collection, which also included swimwear, layering a bathing suit with a fabric turned backward. Frays, knotting, blowtorch holes: The designers obviously enjoyed setting their imaginations loose.

By  on October 4, 2017

Ottolinger had a new theme this spring: rural Switzerland. That’s where they found a traditional edelweiss flower fabric.“This is what the farmers work in,” said Cosima Gadient, tugging at her top to show the flowers. She and her design partner Christa Bösch applied their knotting technique, which they have used in the past, to their new material, building a button-up wrap dress.The pair is known for deconstructing garments, reassembling them in unexpected ways. The zipper on a pair of jeans in the collection was skewed to the side, and the inside seam gradually crept outward as it ran down the leg. The knotted sash on the back of a shirt? That was a shirt sleeve. They also played with dyeing techniques.“We tried to have our own colors,” noted Bösch, eyeing a pair of thigh-high nylons that were dyed in a mustard brown color. They chose a boat to display the collection, which also included swimwear, layering a bathing suit with a fabric turned backward. Frays, knotting, blowtorch holes: The designers obviously enjoyed setting their imaginations loose.

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