Pascal Millet literally followed the teaching of Voltaire’s “Candide,” where it is written that one must “grow your garden.” “I loved the idea,” the designer said backstage after the show, explaining he recently reread the book. It made him dream up images of a young French woman, in floral prints, tending to her garden or reading there.

For spring, Millet presented an array of daywear and nightwear, with many pieces festooned, such as the multicolored, long silk dresses and skirts. He used lace — for the first time — sometimes with embroidered flowery motifs, plus denim and silk, mixed and matched.

Standouts included the streamlined white dress with a cinched waist and three-quarter sleeves, and the white lace top paired with wide denim trousers. Millet was angling for a modern wardrobe and succeeded, though the silhouettes could have been varied even more.

By  on September 28, 2017

Pascal Millet literally followed the teaching of Voltaire’s “Candide,” where it is written that one must “grow your garden.” “I loved the idea,” the designer said backstage after the show, explaining he recently reread the book. It made him dream up images of a young French woman, in floral prints, tending to her garden or reading there.

For spring, Millet presented an array of daywear and nightwear, with many pieces festooned, such as the multicolored, long silk dresses and skirts. He used lace — for the first time — sometimes with embroidered flowery motifs, plus denim and silk, mixed and matched.

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